Interesting Brake Pad Video

Brakes for your Classic Mopar

  1. Dana67Dart

    Dana67Dart Like a fine wine, only getting better with age! FABO Gold Member

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    Very interesting info.

     
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    • Mattax

      Mattax Just the facts, ma'am FABO Gold Member

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      Interesting.
      Too bad they hid the edge codes and also the general composition of the of the friction material.
      In fact we don't even know if the low. mid, and upper were all from the same manufacturer.
      So while an informative video, I don't feel we can accept the generalized conclusions of the narrator.

      As a point of reference, any of our disk brake equiped A-bodies will rarely see lining temperatures in the ranges they focused on.
      I have temperature sensitive paint marking my pads, calipers, drums and shoes. Hasn't hit 600 F yet.
      However there are some cars out there with undersized brakes - so those temperatures we would only see on a road course or maybe towing a trailer out of the mountains, some drivers will see. Some Subies and early Ford SHOs come to mind.
       
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      • Mattax

        Mattax Just the facts, ma'am FABO Gold Member

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        FWIW Cut and paste from my moparts thread on edge codes.

        A bit more on expected temperatures:
        On the SHO Times (website) the webmaster/author used equations from Fred Puhn Brake Handbook (HP Books 1985) to calculate the expected temperatures for factory rotors making one stop. The small brakes initially used by Ford on the SHO was somewhat of a problem for owners.

        Stock 1989 Ford SHO
        From 60 mph the front rotors would experience about 220 F degree rise in temperature.

        From 120 mph, the same rotors calculate to an increase in temperature of 750 F degrees.

        lets compare using the same method of calculation.

        3400 lb A-body with factory 4 piston calipers and 10x1.75 rear drums:
        60 mph stop calculates to 107 F degrees,
        and even if the rear drums did nothing, the disks would only increase 147 F degrees.*

        From 120 mph the temperature rise will be 430 F degrees
        and if the drums did nothing it still only calculates to 590 F degree increase.*

        I thought this comparison would be helpful in clarifying what temperature ranges our brakes will see even in a single highway stop, as well as a single very high speed stop. Repeated stops without time to cool will of course increase the temperatures further. To quote the SHO Times author
        "...measured 385 F on my front rotors in rush hour traffic on a 45 mph street because of several sequential stoplights. (I have an 89 SHO with 10.1 in. rotors.) ...four back to back 60 mph stops generated 550 F."

        *The reason for calculating the temperature rise both with and without rear brake contribution is because its not known which way the SHO calculations were done. The SHO is a front engined, front wheel drive car so the rear brakes remove less energy than our better balanced RWD cars.
         
        Last edited: Nov 10, 2019
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