Proper use of old style hand crimpers

Discussion in 'Electrical and Ignition' started by Pawned, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. Pawned

    Pawned N.R.A. Lifetime Member - And damn proud of it FABO Gold Member

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    I became aware that I had been using my hand crimper incorrectly for the last 50 some years.

    I would like slantsixdan to comment on this, as he seems to know just about everything on the subject. (and if you don't believe me just ask him) :eek:)

    I have three pictures, showing three different ways to crimp a solderless connector.

    OK weigh in, Which is the proper ways to crimp a connector

    20180709_090817.jpg

    20180709_090918.jpg

    20180709_090943.jpg
     
  2. Wicked31

    Wicked31 Well-Known Member

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    First one is correct for non insulated crimps. You need to use the insulated part on the tool for that connector.
     
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    • toolmanmike

      toolmanmike FABO Staff Staff Member FABO Gold Member

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      Correct-o-mungo!
       
    • Treblig

      Treblig FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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      That's a very good question!! I like to use the method used in the first pic because it traps the two ends of the connector. It you do it like in the 3rd pic it tends to open up the open ends of the connector. But I always go one step further and re-crimp with a heavy duty set of crimpers, I can post pics later. These heavy duty crimpers don't have the wire stripper holes, they are only for crimping. Once I've used the crimper that you show in your pics I then crush the connector with the heavy duty crimpers totally trapping the wire.
      I'm sure other FABO members will have plenty of input!!!

      treblig
       
    • mopowers

      mopowers Well-Known Member

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      I always thought for non-insulated connectors, that the indent goes on the side opposite of the seam???

      Have any of the crimps you made in the previous 50 years come undone?
       
      Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
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      • mopar_nocar

        mopar_nocar Well-Known Member

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        Wait...there is a "new" style of crimper?

        sb
         
      • Pawned

        Pawned N.R.A. Lifetime Member - And damn proud of it FABO Gold Member

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        Too many to count. I usually ended up stripping the wire a little long and then soldering the end of the wire as it stuck out the crimp
         
      • Pawned

        Pawned N.R.A. Lifetime Member - And damn proud of it FABO Gold Member

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        I am now finding that picture B, the crimp will not pull out. Crimping like picture A, the wire pulled out way too easy, unless I reinforced the tip with solder

        I am using a different style crimper and connectors that when crimped the wire is in there good and will not pull out. plus there is no room to use solder
         
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        • Pawned

          Pawned N.R.A. Lifetime Member - And damn proud of it FABO Gold Member

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          On these connectors, I use the D jaws to crimp the stripped end of the wire and the F jaws for the crimp on the insulator jacket. I strip about 1/8 " to 3 /16" of insulator jacket off the wire and crimp that.

          This crimper I have had for over 35 years


          female connector b.jpg

          female connector tool.jpg

          female connector.jpg
           
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          • Cuda Al

            Cuda Al Well-Known Member

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          • Dicer

            Dicer Well-Known Member

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            Trick question...Picture "B" is the correct location for that type of connector. Post #9 is whole different type of connector and you are right indeed, it does take that type of pliers for that type of connector. I have about 2-3 different types of crimping pliers. Here is a picture of a properly crimped wire using the pliers and connector from the first post....

            361.jpg
             
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            • JoeSBP

              JoeSBP RLTW!

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              Maybe he means manual vs the ratchet or “aircraft” style.

              Advantage of the ratchet style is you can dial in how much you crunch the terminal, so each crimp will be uniform. I bought a Klein ratchet crimper when I rewired bumper to bumper, worth every penny and then some!

              KLEIN TOOLS VDV200-010 Ratcheting Crimper Frame *Dies Sold Separately* https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07DQ6FYYR/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_bi8qBbVZP96HR

              https://www.amazon.com/Replacement-...6_SY340_QL65&keywords=klein+barrel+crimp+dies
               
              Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
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              • toolmanmike

                toolmanmike FABO Staff Staff Member FABO Gold Member

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                The photo you posted is a non-insulated connector. The original poster showed a insulated terminal. The insulated terminals use a crimper that just smashes the terminal flat. The non-insulated crimpers will poke holes in the insulation sleeve which defeats the purpose of the insulating sleeve. The terminals the OP posted are Harbor freight/parts store terminals. Better than wrapping a wire around a screw but they are not the best quality. Probably the best terminals are the Micropac terminals with the dual tangs, one pair of tangs grips the insulation and the other pair crimps around the conductor of the wire. Those crimps use a different style crimper and produce a "w" style crimp. This type of crimp is used on most of our Mopars.

                crimped-wire-terminal.jpg
                 
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                • JoeSBP

                  JoeSBP RLTW!

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                  This is why I like FABO so much.
                  So much “common knowledge” being shared that just ain’t common these days. Thankyou gents for all the tips I learn from this community daily. Much appreciated!
                   
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                  • Tooljunkie

                    Tooljunkie King of cobble/master of the broken bolt FABO Gold Member

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                    I use channel lock wire crimpers.
                    When necessary i solder as a follow up, especially on ground ring terminals.
                     
                  • JoeSBP

                    JoeSBP RLTW!

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                    Here are the dies I used. If you look closely you can see they have two rows of jaws. One row barrel crimps the terminal on the wire, the other row has greater clearance, and crimps the terminal onto the insulated portion. Now for the bulkhead connectors @toolmanmike posted, I had to grind the insulated row thinner, as it would bite into the stop-tangs on the terminal..

                    9FA95AA7-EF6C-4B3E-AFB4-D244EA49714E.jpeg

                    A56709B8-5557-44E7-A566-4198EC8F161B.jpeg
                     
                  • Pawned

                    Pawned N.R.A. Lifetime Member - And damn proud of it FABO Gold Member

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                    It is my understanding that this is the porper die for a crimp tool use on a solderless connector

                    crimp head.jpg
                     
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                    • JoeSBP

                      JoeSBP RLTW!

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                      For an insulated one
                       
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                      • famous bob

                        famous bob mopar misfit

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                        Dan guys, I have the same crimpers as the orig. post, have used them rewiring the whole car, and everything else I`ve had to do wiring on. I always crimp the ins. ones to the point of cutting the ins., and then slide some heat shrink over it , 'IF" I can rember to put it on, haven`t had any problems w/ any connectors installed in any position. I always pull on them pretty hard to make sure thei good to go. Been doing it that way for 45years?
                        I think u guys are overthinking the whole process !
                         
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                        • Cuda Al

                          Cuda Al Well-Known Member

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                          Not sure anyone is overthinking it, there is a proper tool for each terminal and a proper way to use each tool.

                          Although the tool in the original post is the common tool it isn’t the proper tool for insulated terminals.

                          That tool is designed for uninsulated terminals without the strain relief. When used on uninsulated terminals the male peg part goes on the bottom (opposite the seam).

                          Insulated terminals require a tool that compresses the terminal uniformly on both sides without damage to the insulation.

                          Terminals with the strain relief typically require a specific tool that is designed to both crimp the terminal on the wire and press the strain relief into the insulation.

                          Can you use that tool on insulated terminals, yes, I wouldn’t.


                          Alan
                           
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                          • fishfly

                            fishfly Well-Known Member

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                            I agree 100%. Unfortunately, I've seen many jobs where they crimp the male tooth on the seam...it's supposed to be opposite the seam for a non insulated terminal like cuda al said. Once you have tried the proper crimp tool after using the one pictured for so long you'll know why the proper tool is important to obtain consistent strong crimps that are easy to do and easy on the hands after a big job. In the past I have only used the one as pictured for cutting wire and maybe a small non insulated crimp and I never used them again once I got the ratcheting crimper. If the price is a concern, the klein crimping/cutting tool (part#1005 or similar - harbor freight has a similar style) is superior to the one pictured in the original post IMO. I bought the S&G crimper a couple of years ago for around 75 bucks and comes with hard case and about 5 dies. love it. As far as I'm concerned it paid for itself on a complete rewire. All my wiring is by 3 tools. The ratchet crimper, the klein tool for cutting (sometimes a crimp), and the home depot/box store wire stripper that cuts the insulation and pulls the coating off in one squeeze without cutting into the copper.

                             
                            Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
                          • crackedback

                            crackedback FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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                            The terminals in #9 require an F type crimper or open barrel.

                            Crimping insulated and non-insulated terminals use different crimpers.
                             
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                            • fishfly

                              fishfly Well-Known Member

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                              the reason option B is correct for a non insulated terminal (and is not correct for the insulated terminal as shown-therefore all 3 options A,B, and C are incorrect) is that if you put the tooth on the seam, it will divide the copper wire strands roughly in half and also smash or even possibly break the wire strands directly beneath the tooth. Also, you will probably be left with some wire strands located directly beneath the tooth with no contact except for maybe the plastic you distorted and punched a hole in for water, dirt, etc. to enter. The seam is only to allow the metal "tube" portion to deform from the tooth stress applied on the side opposite to the seam. I see about 100 connections in the background of the pic :eek:
                               
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                              • Dfr360cuda

                                Dfr360cuda Well-Known Member

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                                ..............
                                I suggest something like this.
                                The colors designate wire size.
                                Yellow = 10 and 12 gauge
                                Blue = 14 and 16 gauge
                                Red = 18 - 22 gauge.
                                I would get a Klein or Greenlee tool.
                                 
                              • oldskool979

                                oldskool979 FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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                                Case in point. Just finished replacing elec fans on my Shelby Dakota. Had to pull radiator. Wouldn't start afterward. Seemed to be an ignition issue with MSD box. Power showed on LED but no spark. After a lot of head scratching and fussing I tracked the problem to the master ground wire from the MSD. It terminated on a marine ground strip behind the battery. The wire routed across the core support had pulled out of the terminal when I pulled the radiator, but the bare end of the wire was still resting on the terminal end. Carried enough current to show power on the MSD but not to start. Using a better connector with a strain relief or soldering the terminal would have saved a lot of aggravation. Live and learn.
                                 
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