Seeking wisdom from those who have installed a lift

Righty Tighty

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Can anyone chime in as to the safety of the 2 post vs. 4 post? One risk that I have heard about is the car's weight shifting on the 2 post if you remove parts or add parts, and it flips up.
 

inertia

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I have often parked the vehicle nose heavy to ease access of trans removal, cuz of the cable cover on the floor, - using my transjack, it straddles the hump. No drama .
I do get anxious leaving vehicles up high overnight/indefinitely cuz we're sorta in an "earthquake" zone, I lower vehicles to lowest lock. . my personal "thing" .

EDIT !!

I will add, the pic shows a 7000 lb lift.
It won't lift new trucks, struggles, so go bigger if you can.

I had 1 of the floor cables, with hump, - another, same make, cables overhead, with a "bridge", that you couldn't raise a van or lifted 4x4, all the way up, - and a 4 post, in my commercial locations.
Each had it's own use.
When I retired, -. I kept this one .
 
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volaredon

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Nothing unsafe about a 2 post that's set up right and lift pads set up right under the vehicle as long as the lift isn't overloaded a 4 post is much more "in the way".
Unless you're doing alignments. Then you need a 4 post.
 

inertia

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Just as a side note, if you take the lift with you, easy peesy to pound anchors into floor, and cement the few holes remaining .
 

Tooljunkie

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There is little to no safety issue with a 4 post. Unless you roll it off the end, but there are plates on the front, and back has plates or ramps serve as stops if they are hinged.
Nearly impossible to damage a vehicle in a 4 post, but something you need to be aware of with a 2 post. Bent rockers, floors, fender bottoms, one instance where a garage did a safety on a 67 mustang and the tech bent the torque boxes. Not all cars are well suited for 2 post lifts.
Not to mention the two 2 foot by 19 foot long work benches to pile tools and parts on. I never have to set wheels on floor and lift them back up to mount. Stand em up and roll into place.
Sure makes my life easier, and my impact doesent ever fall to the floor now.

it raises vehicles 7” off the floor, so extra height makes underhood work on taller vehicles a challenge sometimes.
And clearance for shop crane to pull engines adds more height. Unless its an open front hoist. Those are really the ticket.
 

inertia

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Another side note,

I leased to purchase these lifts a number of years ago, for, like $60 each per mo. over 3 years from "National Equipment Rentals"

You might want to look into similar .
 
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furyus2

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Can anyone chime in as to the safety of the 2 post vs. 4 post? One risk that I have heard about is the car's weight shifting on the 2 post if you remove parts or add parts, and it flips up.
I have seen pictures of both types that failed. Buying the best quality that you can afford is a start. On a 2 post, you can use a tall stand to give extra safety. Also, I have one piece uprights on my lift. I think it makes it just a little safer. Cost hasn't been discussed, but you don't want to shop for the cheapest. Anyway, a 4 post is more expensive, especially when you buy the jacking plate.
 

SLOPAR72

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Rule one is the installation. Proper flooring and Anchoring that's not compromised. Number 2 is understanding that you life depends on how you use the lift. Take your time putting cars on it, and double check yourself. Excellent condition Pads are a priority or otherwise you can slide the car off the legs.

I set my legs and raise a car until the tires are off the ground and shake it good. If I don't like something down it goes for a reset. I also use stands if I am working under it. I can't overstate safety with any lift. I like a 2 post however my style of working on cars may differ from yours....

JW
 

str12-340

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you need to be aware of with a 2 post. Bent rockers, floors, fender bottoms, one instance where a garage did a safety on a 67 mustang and the tech bent the torque boxes. Not all cars are well suited for 2 post lifts.

This sounds like operator error to me...
 

str12-340

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Here are pictures of my hoist. I did my time installing Torqueflites and 8 3/4 chunks in a car on 4 jackstands in the gravel on my back... with the item on my chest. This is the best and most safety conscious tool that I ever bought for working on a car!. You can see the beam across the two posts, which also eliminates the hump on the floor. There is a picture of a couple of the four tall jack stands that I have (mentioned by someone in a previous post). Placed under frame rails at the front and back it virtually eliminates the problem of tipping the vehicle when moving heavy things like complete rear ends that are in front of, or behind, the arms of the lift. Oddly enough there were specific instructions about when you needed these in the lift instruction manual and an idiot stick man warning on the post showing them in use. They also allow you to do things like put the weight on the front or rear springs to check all sorts of clearances with the car in the air. At the end of the pics you will see my solution for not enough floor space in the garage...

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str12-340

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By the way another idea that I stole from another shop - see the fluorescent light boxes on the side walls (pics with the car in them)? There are actually 2 sets of 2 (you can't see the lower ones). That way you have light when you raise the car and the body blocks the overhead lights...
 

Righty Tighty

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By the way another idea that I stole from another shop - see the fluorescent light boxes on the side walls (pics with the car in them)? There are actually 2 sets of 2 (you can't see the lower ones). That way you have light when you raise the car and the body blocks the overhead lights...
Great idea. I don't think I would have thought of that on my own.
 

Righty Tighty

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A question for those following along: is there a way to tell the strength of the concrete without knowing beforehand?
 

Swinger 340

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A question for those following along: is there a way to tell the strength of the concrete without knowing beforehand?
You can take a 1/2 - 5/8 masonry drill bit and drill a hole. If is drills out easy than I would think it is a low strenth pour. If you are truly concern you can cut out a spot and have it tested at your local concrete plant. I think they charge around $100.00.
 

Righty Tighty

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Well everyone, I appreciate all the input. I found a John Bean 12K two post lift made by Wheeltronics, and have hired an installer. I chose to have it put in professionally because it's not worth risking A) damaging the slab or B) making a mistake and having the lift fail while I'm under a car.

It's being put in Wednesday, how exciting!
 

missing linc

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Well everyone, I appreciate all the input. I found a John Bean 12K two post lift made by Wheeltronics, and have hired an installer. I chose to have it put in professionally because it's not worth risking A) damaging the slab or B) making a mistake and having the lift fail while I'm under a car.

It's being put in Wednesday, how exciting!
I think you have made some very good decisions, I know you will be very happy with. Post some pictures when it's up and running.
 

JDMopar

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Wise decision! I have a 4-post lift and every time I raise a car up on it, I walk all the way around it and check to make sure that all 4 locks are fully engaged before I go under the vehicle. Knowing that you had it installed correctly will give you the confidence to work under it.

:thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

Righty Tighty

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Well ****. I was at the shop earlier and the landlord stopped by. He said he found the paperwork on the slab and that it was a 4" slab. We talked and he agreed to let me cut the slab to pour a thicker footprint where the lift will go. I guess it's good to know these things now rather than later, when the installer shows up to drill the concrete....
 

Swinger 340

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Well ****. I was at the shop earlier and the landlord stopped by. He said he found the paperwork on the slab and that it was a 4" slab. We talked and he agreed to let me cut the slab to pour a thicker footprint where the lift will go. I guess it's good to know these things now rather than later, when the installer shows up to drill the concrete....
If you are going to pour a footer or pad, I would install the anchors in the new pour and if you ever wanted to remove them, cut them off. A all- thread bent at a 90 degree would be the way to go. Drill holes in the existing concrete and install rebar to hold the new pour in place. Cut a template out of wood to match the base and insert the all thread anchors into the wet concrete. Just make sure the concrete is set before installing the lift, maybe 30 days.
 

Righty Tighty

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Thanks. I was actually wondering about that — adding the anchors to the wet concrete.
 

Tooljunkie

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#1 reason i like my 4 post:
I have a place to pile tools and stuff…
2C1A6DFC-C9D1-4FD0-AD5C-7F94AD3C983B.jpeg

a note about setting all-thread in concrete, typically its grade 2 hardware. Best to find high strength all-thread.
 

Righty Tighty

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There was a 4 post here for sale that had wheels and a jack attachment, that got snatched up pretty quickly.
Best to find high strength all-thread.
Makes me wonder how hard it would be to find grade 5 or grade 8 all thread. I’ve never needed it, so I’ve never even looked for it.
 
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