tanks inc pa4 vs surge tank for efi

dusterbd13

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Either way will get me what I want as far as fuel delivery. Surge tank has more complexity, but easier service. The tanks inc module will be simpler, but harder to side of road repair.

What I guess it boils down to is the installation.

For those of you that have gone with either, can you post pictures and driving impressions, especially of the pr4? Ive got a daily driven efi muscle car with a surge tank parked in the driveway, so I know the results of that. Im just not seeing anywhere to stuff The hardware without going into the trunk.

So, shoot me some pictures of both ways if you have them. And if anyone has a stock tank laying on the floor, I could use some weasurements of the very top where it hits the trunk floor. The flat section where I could mount the tanks module and see if it would even fit.

Thanks

Michael
 

jbc426

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It won't fit on top of the tank because of the trunk floor unless you weld in a recessed area for it. I run a surge tank in my '68 feed by a stock tank with 3/8 feed and return lines feed by a pusher pump right outside the tank. It works great and love it. I'm considering swapping my '70 over to EFI, and will likely use an in-tank pump/pumps and a surge tank.

I won't be cutting the trunk floor, so I will have to recess my tank too. Right now, it's got a custom 30 gallon stainless tank with a -12 feed to a traditional dual return fuel system.

A lot of the very high output tuner guys add surge tanks to their factory EFI cars due to fuel slosh issues even with well designed factory tanks.

View attachment B4.jpg
 

dusterbd13

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So you put your surge tank in the engine bay. Got any better pictures?

As far as the tanks pa4 fittings hitting the trunk floor, I know that I'll be close. Near as I can tell, I've got 1/2-3/4 ibch of clearance now, and could easily gain more with some well placed hammer blows or a dome in the floor.
 

jbc426

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Depending on how much horsepower you are feeding, there is no need to use anything but a stock tank. Grab yourself a 3/8" or even 1/2" sending unit. Silver solder in a like sized return line, mount a fuel-proof electrical connector and attach an appropriate sized electric efi pump to the pick-up line. Make sure it will fit through your sending unit hole.

Then run two lines to the front of the car to feed and return from the surge tank. It's really a simple set-up, just like you would plumb to run a return regulator. I bought a surge tank from Radium Engineering. It's easy to mount, is super easy to hook up, and the lines running from it to the fuel rails and back are the only high pressure fuel in the system. The lines that run from the fuel tank to the surge tank and back run at just over "0" psi, but they carry a large volume of fuel.

I have run my tank down to 2 gallons with this set-up at Willow Springs Raceway without sucking air into my high-pressure feed. It's actually less expensive and give much higher performance than running a poorly designed baffled tank.

I'll try and post more pictures of the surge tank later.
 

jbc426

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Depending on how much horsepower you are feeding, there is no need to use anything but a stock tank. Grab yourself a 3/8" or even 1/2" sending unit. Silver solder in a like sized return line, mount a fuel-proof electrical connector and attach an appropriate sized electric efi pump to the pick-up line. Make sure it will fit through your sending unit hole.

Then run two lines to the front of the car to feed and return from the surge tank. It's really a simple set-up, just like you would plumb to run a return regulator. I bought a surge tank from Radium Engineering. It's easy to mount, is super easy to hook up, and the lines running from it to the fuel rails and back are the only high pressure fuel in the system. The lines that run from the fuel tank to the surge tank and back run at just over "0" psi, but they carry a large volume of fuel.

I have run my tank down to 2 gallons with this set-up at Willow Springs Raceway without sucking air into my high-pressure feed. It's actually less expensive and give much higher performance than running a poorly designed baffled tank.

I'll try and post more pictures of the surge tank later.

I used a model very similar to the ones shown in the link posted just above this post.

I never went back and posted pictures for this response, so here they are. Sorry for the delay.

Sending unit mod 2.jpg


Sending unit mod 3.jpg


eng5 (Medium).png
 
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