Trans flush with no convertor plug...

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pishta

I know I'm right....
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Whats procedure? I'm thinking pull cooler line into bucket and run another line back to trans and gravity feed it new fluid in via funnel at about the same rate? In neutral so it pumps? Flush until it runs red or out of fresh ATF? Cycle the selector a few times to clear the passages? Dumb they didn't put a plug on this convertor. Fluid came out looking like oil but didn't smell burned at all. Weird. 194k miles FWD Transaxle. Thanks!
 
At 194k some say if you service it now, it will be short lived.
Did you look up what factory fluid is, I have seen some use some fluid that is darker and some that smell burnt when new.
 
or "TRUST" the local shop with a trans fluid flusher.

Or you could DIY it.

basically you want the same amount of fluid to go in as comes out.

a sealed system will do this. As old fluid goes into the right sealed container it displaces air which displaces air in the other sealed container and forces new fluid into the transmission.

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If it's got over 60,000 miles & never been changed, DON'T TOUCH IT! If it's had a few changes since new, you're OK. If it shifts alright, just drain the fluid in the pan, install a new filter, refill with fresh fluid. (ATF+4?) Unless you can afford the fluid, (It aint' cheap anymore) what 4speedragtop suggested.
 
It is true that you can kill a trans with a lot of miles on it by changing the fluid.
New detergents can eat older clutch materials.
 
It is true that you can kill a trans with a lot of miles on it by changing the fluid.
New detergents can eat older clutch materials.
I've heard this many years ago (Over 30) that if you have more than 60 or so thousand miles on your vehicle & the trans fluid has never been changed, leave it alone or you may very well have transmission problems. I did this to a customer's 74 Buick Regal, against my advising him not to. His transmission went less than a week later. Coincidence? Maybe, but I won't do it.
 
Whats procedure? I'm thinking pull cooler line into bucket and run another line back to trans and gravity feed it new fluid in via funnel at about the same rate? In neutral so it pumps? Flush until it runs red or out of fresh ATF? Cycle the selector a few times to clear the passages? Dumb they didn't put a plug on this convertor. Fluid came out looking like oil but didn't smell burned at all. Weird. 194k miles FWD Transaxle. Thanks!
There are two ways of flushing/changing all the oil in your transmission.
A: I don't know where you live, but where I live, all quickie lube shops have a piece of equipment that allows them to change/flush your transmission of ALL oil in the unit. There is nothing really magical about this despite they often will tell you that the machine is doing all the work to get rid of your dirty oil. Some of these wizards will also inform you that their machine will, are you ready for this, BACK flush your transmission. The machine is smoke and mirrors game. For the machines I've seen, both in operation and at trade shows, the engine must be running. The reason of course is, without the engine running, the transmission pump aint working, and neither is the flushing machine.
B: Get two 5 gallon plastic drums and about 10 feet of transmission cooler line hose. Connect the hose to the transmission lines. Place each line in one of the buckets. Now here is the big secret :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: , the discharge line goes into the empty bucket(bucket b), and the suction line goes into the bucket(bucket a) you filled with new transmission fluid. Put the car in neutral and start your engine. When you see nice new oil going into bucket b, you've flushed/changed all the oil in your transmission. When finished, shut the engine off and replace the cooler lines back on the transmission. Now, you can if so desired, let people know that you too can now FLUSH their transmissions.
Side note: If your converter is a lockup unit, you may have to cycle it a couple of times. Very few OEM converters have drain plugs in them.
Hope this helps.
 
My buddy warms up the vehicle. Takes the return line off and puts a hose on the line. Then puts the hose into a 5 gallon bucket. He has a helper pour the fluid down the tube. He says u can see when the fluid changes colour. Then you’re done. This is with or without changing the filter. Kim
 
My buddy warms up the vehicle. Takes the return line off and puts a hose on the line. Then puts the hose into a 5 gallon bucket. He has a helper pour the fluid down the tube. He says u can see when the fluid changes colour. Then you’re done. This is with or without changing the filter. Kim
Thanks Kim. By the way, most Quickie Lube shops when they flush the transmission, DON'T change the filter. Takes too much time to do.
 
This fluid is done, I cant see how this black stuff (an inch over the full mark too) could be good and of course I drained it into a dirty pan with a few leaves and treed droppings into it so its not reuseable. Its a FWD Mazda with the Ford/Mazda 5F27EL transmission. I took the valve body out and back flushed all 6 of the servos , they all spec out in OHMs and all click with power. Cleaned the valve body and i didnt find any metal particles in the pan so I think its just a high mileage auto with the normal fuzz on the magnet. On a few recommendations Im using 2 gallons of Walmart high mileage ATF instead of $16/qt Type M ATF that I guarantee no quicky lube place has on hand. Heck, its special order at my Oreilly and Vatozone. Itll be an experiment for sure. Does a 727/904 even pump through the VB in P? I thought at a minimum you had to put it in N...?
 
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