Western WA climate and building options

Cascade Regional Board

  1. paulclark

    paulclark Early A fanatic FABO Gold Member

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    I'm making plans to convert some of my parking to covered parking. I'm curious about what peoples' experience has been as far as what level of construction gives the best return.
    Sure, better is better, but how much better? I have a large fleet, so it's a matter of balancing quality with quantity. I'm asking here because in our rainy Western WA climate the answer will be different from Maine or Texas.


    I'm planning a shop building with inside parking space certainly, the more the better. What I'm wondering about is the value of also putting up carports for some of the others. This could vary from minimal to deluxe, I'm wondering what the sweet spots are in our climate

    I's like to hear from those who have upgraded from one level to another, how much difference in result they saw? Obviously more is better, but how much?

    Waterproof covers are a lot better than nothing.

    It seems like getting them out from under the rain under a dry carport is a considerable step up, even from keeping them under a waterproof tarp.

    The next stage would be a 'modified carport' in which some kinds of walls or fencing might be added, for security or visuals and as a windbreak, but not sealed. This seems to be good for a budget or for skating under permitting. Otherwise - how much improvement is this over sitting under a tarp outside?

    Because the next step is an enclosed garage. This would cost more, but guessing the jump up is considerable. Still, with venting and no insulation, I wonder how much improvement is this?

    Next up is adding insulation, and I hear many people who build garages advise installing insulation right away. I'm guessing this is a big jump in regulating temperature and therefore a corresponding improvement in preservation.

    Next beyond that is heated garage. That's gotta be better, how much better?

    Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2021
  2. barbee6043

    barbee6043 barbee 6043 FABO Gold Member

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    SE Texas. can be wet and always humid.
    A roof is good. Metal roof and framed with lumber, which has now gone way up. Or frame with used oil stem for poles,and c's or z's.. C's and roof tin can be much cheaper IF you stay away from the company stores!
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2021
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    • str12-340

      str12-340 FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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      I'm right across the water from you on Vashon. Two suggestions:
      #1-If you build a building or a car port use standing seam roofing: waterproof, doesn't wear out, easy to repair.

      #2-I have a couple of those steel frame 'hoop' garages with a fabric cover. If you buy the good ones they can really last - I have one that's been up for 13 years and shows no sign of deterioration - if you go that direction for some relatively cheap cover make sure that you keep water from wicking into the building from the bottom. They make a fabric floor cover. If you just put it over dirt or gravel the cover will keep it all inside and you will find everything covered with moisture. We use the waterproof fabric floor and leave the roll-up door open all the time

      PM if you want details.
       
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      • geminimotors

        geminimotors Well-Known Member

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        39C6184D-BF6F-413D-827E-F225021799CA.jpeg
        Anything to keep the pine needles off! I have (had) two cars under a carport on Vashon.
         
      • 12valve

        12valve Well-Known Member

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        I live roughly an hour north of Seattle just outside of Burlington. There are several ways to solve your problems, it really depends on your budget and long term plans. 10 years ago I helped a buddy build a 36' by 80' main shop. Since then, we added covered "wings" to it so that it looks more like a Monitor barn. Eventually he has plans to enclose the wings as his budget allows, but for now it's just a covered slab on both sided of the shop. He keeps his project cars and parts under there. In our environment the more cover you can keep them under the better. Needles and leaves are the worst for trapping water against the metal and accelerating the decay. My shop is smaller than his, but my needs and budget are different than his. I built my shop out of ICF blocks (my house is built using the same methods) and my floor is heated with a high efficiency boiler. The ICF is super efficient at holding heat so it only adds minimally to my NG bill. I did this because my job is generally slower in the winter time, allowing me time to work on stuff more regularly, and it's much easier to be motivated when the shop is 65*.
         
      • 70dart340

        70dart340 FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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        I'm in south Snohomish county. I built a 24'X34 enclosed garage, might be too small for your needs. I used a concrete slab and wall footings, an 2X6 studs. R-34 insulation in the walls, and 2 layers+ of R-19 insulation in the ceiling. It has it's own 200 amp feed. I'm in the middle of a town, so this is as big as I could go on my city lot. It stays dry, RH less than 40% with only a small space heater. Never gets below 55 degrees, even if it's 20 degrees out side. The auto bay is shared with my wife's Pilot, and my 70 Swinger 340. The rest is taken up with my machine/wood shop. I believe the key is in the thickest walls you can afford, and the most insulation you can put in it. JMO.
         
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