Proper use of old style hand crimpers

Discussion in 'Electrical and Ignition' started by Pawned, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. adriver

    adriver Blazing Apostle

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    Did someone mention Klein?
    My go to.

    Yea, I know ", uninsulated".
    Just squeeze the doo out of it.
    Work good last a long time.
    Solder if necessary.

    362-110_HR_0.jpg





    I've spent more time with one in my hands than I care to think about.
    This stuff can get needlessly expensive.

    mNXjq8EqA7eAJPGovC1da2w.jpg
     
  2. toolmanmike

    toolmanmike FABO Staff Staff Member FABO Gold Member

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    Klein is good stuff. Those were originally designed by Thomas and Betts until the patent ran out. LOL I sold hundreds. They are forged and not stamped steel like the cheapies. You can put a death grip on those without a tool failure. They also make a insulated/non insulated crimper as well. tct112p.jpg
     
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    • famous bob

      famous bob mopar misfit

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      Still think u guys are overblowing it !-------I`m pushing 72 and never had any problems w/ what I have --------If it`still insulated, and u cant pull it out, all is good!
       
    • skykeith

      skykeith Well-Known Member

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      These are AMP PIDG crimpers. The holy grail of insulated terminal crimpers. The terminal pictured is an AMP PIDG crimp, it meets military, aviation, marine, and almost all OEM specs. The bad news is, these things are expensive and unless you are doing crimps for a living, there's no way to justify the cost.
      The Klein crimpers for non-insulated terminals do a good crimp.
      I like the MSD crimper. They will outlive you and you can get any jaw set you need and they are one of the few that will crimp weather pack connectors properly.
      If you crimp a terminal and have to add solder to get it to hold, then it isn't 015 (800x600).jpg crimpers 024 (800x600).jpg crimped properly.
       
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      • fishfly

        fishfly Active Member

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        agreed. To me at least, chasing electrical problems is frustrating. Some people actually enjoy it. I don't. That's why I try to be as exact and consistent as possible when it comes to anything electrical. There's really not much extra work involved to do things the right way to begin with. I have about $100 invested in my go-to crimping tools and wire strippers and if it saved me at least one of the ever so common occurrences of electrical gremlins that I read about on these old mopars it's worth to me at least double that amount. I'll just be blunt here...IMO that crimp tool in the OP is garbage and good for nothing except maybe cutting or stripping a wire in a pinch when you can't reach your better tool. There's a reason it's $5 or even free from harbor freight. I understand when money is tight, but like I said before for a few bucks more the klein, or similar would be much better. I've also read where people think the harder you squeeze the wire/connnector the better...not so. Copper does have a strain limit that when reached can lead to failure. That becomes important places where there is vibration, pulling, etc. The proper crimp tool will give you consistent pressures on the crimp as many tend to squeeze the life out of it. Some cover the damage on an insulated terminal with a wrap and while that's better than punching a hole and leaving it, it's not the best way to go about it especially if that's what is holding the connection together. I can have a piss poor connection and put 6 inches of shrink wrap on each side and pull hard and say "oh yea this is strong"..when actually I might have only a fraction of the wires making contact. Then multiply that over many connections and there is a "snowball effect" that in the best scenario leads to a inefficient and imbalanced electrical system.

         
        Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
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        • JoeSBP

          JoeSBP RLTW!

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          • famous bob

            famous bob mopar misfit

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            Just to add a note, the ones I HAVE HAD PERFECT LUCK WITH,, I FOUND !!! And they didn`t come from harbor freight , they came from the pits at tulsa int. raceway !! hahahaha