1. Hemisurfer

    Hemisurfer Member

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    NHRA put the Kabosh on the Porsche seats. The test mule served the purpose of seeing what would be allowed by NHRA In addition to evaluating performance. They floated the idea, NHRA said no. Makes sense if you consider that Porsche seats aren’t really a Chrysler end product not even a US end product. The cut wheel wells was a mod to an existing body when it left the factory/shop it became a factory body. no different than the nose and wing being added to a roadrunner to make a Superbird. As far as odd parts the only other non Chrysler parts were the Headers from Hooker, Corning glass and the Hurst shifters. Everything else was production Chrysler parts. The Corning glass had been used in the 64-65 cars so it had a precedent, the shifters were dual gates used in GTO’s. Porsche seats were too much of a stretch. You could argue that the glass fenders and hoods were non production but they were assigned a Chrysler part number, the A990 lightweights had aluminum fenders and hoods made by outside vendors so again there was a precedent. The Dart and Cudas essentially ended up being A Body versions of the A990 cars. The real advantage was weight. The use of outside construction and vendors is still in use today the shaker challengers go to a vendor for the shaker install it’s not done at the factory assembly line.
     
  2. SSing

    SSing Well-Known Member

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    Yes, if you know this for a fact I thank you for good info on this. I simply hung up on you last word... maybe... and had another theory...
     
  3. SSing

    SSing Well-Known Member

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    Thought I´d share these seldom, if ever seen in public photos with you.
    Engine builder Joe Jill (Speedwin) by the front fender.
    The 4-speed cars came with shifter handle welded to the mechanism. Welding seen here as two white spots.
    The cars was delivered with on shifter boot, but was soon to have one you would imagine. Or shifter was soon swapped for a more service friendly type. That´s why this is a super rare photo...
    SSB C Castaldo J Gill 5 1968 pic.jpg
    Hurst shift mech 2 FABO.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2019
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    • hemicop

      hemicop Well-Known Member

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      Interesting discussion...………. I think those involved should perhaps check with Greg Fernald of S/S and AFX. He's been building clones for years here & has helped me quite a bit. His company has its own website so he's easy to find. I was lucky enough to have a friend that actually worked at the Hurst factory during that period. His take on it all was that they built the cars as quick as possible so quality control really wasn't a concern since they knew they were race cars and were going to be built, modified and raced to death. You see that in the quality of build & parts themselves.
      Years ago I was at "Mopars at the Strip" and a local collector, Dave Blake, had a few barn-find Bo & LO cars on display. NONE of them were the same. Parts, Mounting points for pieces, even the pieces themselves all seemed a bit "off" to varying degrees. So the only thing I can conclude is that Moar gave you the parts. PERIOD ! What you did with them & how was up tp you. SO like any race car there is a minimal "right" way to do things.
      Now if you want to build an "as shipped" version of a car that may actually be a bit easier as all you need are the parts that Hurst put on & a x-rammed Hemi and you're all set.
       
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      • hemicop

        hemicop Well-Known Member

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        JUst a thought here------has anyone built a copy of the "mule car" ? THAT would be interesting as some of the parts were weird. I saw that car once here when it was owned privately. The thing that shocked me was the offset plate for the master cylinder was made of wood!
         
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        • kursplat

          kursplat FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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          makes sense on a mule. wood is quick and easy to work, especialy before CNC equipment
           
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          • SSing

            SSing Well-Known Member

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            Well, in my build it is easy in the way that NHRA did not allow any modifications to the body, so car was raced as it came from Hurst for the first two years while in SS/B.
            Or almost… This shows a little mod done in the S&M shop prior the very first race in spring of 1968. Tall front tire needs some more room...
            SM FTire clear.jpg
             
          • mosleyme

            mosleyme Well-Known Member

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