Wyotech or other tech schools??

General Discussion

  1. siuauto

    siuauto Well-Known Member

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    so i have been exposed to all three. I went to a community college fist and after graduation I went on to get a 4 year degree in automotive. down the road I worked at UTI for almost 10 years. I can only speak to my career and I would say the 4 year degree was the best thing I did. It has opened up more oppertunities than I could every imagine. I would say if you dont want a 4 year, go to a comunity college much less expensive, you will have credits that are transferable incase those knees start hurting and you want to do something else. UTI,WYO or lincolin are ok but very fast paced which often lead to a little knowledge about a lot of areas but not an expert enough to service most vehicle systems.
     
  2. SSG_Karg

    SSG_Karg Stuck in the middle

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    x2
     
  3. 48james

    48james Well-Known Member

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    Wow, Korican! Any other information on McPherson? It doesn't seem bad! A bachelors degree with business school and tech sounds sweet
     
  4. cjh

    cjh Well-Known Member

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    I haven't a clue how it all works over there.....but here, you can do an Apprenticeship, usually goes for 4 years, and you do training at a TAFE College while getting paid to fix cars.
    In some cases, some of the apprentices are just crap....because they are lazy & stuffed around a lot (didn't learn anything much), or the place they did it at, had crappy tradespeople that didn't know sh!t from clay and/or didn't take the time to show them how to do stuff.
    This goes for any of the trades really, from a Plumber, Plasterer, Carpenter, Motor Mechanic, Diesel Fitter, Electrician....etc.

    Don't you's have Apprenticeships anymore over there ????
     
  5. grr8_65

    grr8_65 Well-Known Member

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    You don't have to worry about changing majors, learning how to investigate, evaluate, plan, implement and critique are the attributes needed for success in any field. Most engineering fields have focus application areas. You could take courses in some of those as electives if you have an interest in a specific field outside of your major.

    Decisions, choices, consequences.......

    Best of everything in your future ventures (Luck is not necessary... just hard work)
     
  6. Frankie

    Frankie Member #9641 FABO Gold Member

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    No we don't. Not in the sense that you do in Europe, Scandinavia, and Asia, etc. That is our loss, too. We rely overly heavily on college degrees, book study, and theoretical training, with only very limited hands on training and learning, and perhaps an internship during the summer between a student's junior and senior years in college or university.

    Thank goodness for our technical schools! The have kept manual training alive in this country. The are certainly no replacement for a solid apprenticeship, and that has a tendency to show in the manual arts skills of our new employees over the first 5 years f their selected trades. Yu can also easily tell those students who parents were tradesmen, or even owned and operated their own trade business. Wood workers, Carpenters, plumbers, craftsmen of all types who were raised in the environments of their selected trades are head and shoulders far more superior in the execution of that trade, especially during the first 5 or 6 years of employment.

    Apprenticeships in America ( while still available on an extremely limited basis) have gone by the wayside, and not for the betterment of the country, either.
     
  7. mech1nxh

    mech1nxh CUSTOM TITLE FABO Gold Member

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    Your manufacturer of choice???
     
  8. Korican

    Korican Newb

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  9. cjh

    cjh Well-Known Member

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    Thanks bloke for the eye opener.
     
  10. halifaxhops

    halifaxhops It's going to get stupid around here! FABO Gold Member

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    Rusty for the first time I 100% agree with you. In PA if you join the guard they pay 100% for state tuition and give you a few bucks to live on. Not a bad deal. For more of a technical background look into the Air Guard (I am Biased) Just something to look at. Sounds to me like an engineering degree would work for you with AP math skills. Whatever you decide good luck with it.
     
  11. Darter6

    Darter6 Well-Known Member

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    I went to Denver Automotive and Diesel College. It may still be active. One of my instructors said "With this education you will always have a job.I'm not saying that you will be rich,just that you will never be out of a job." 40 years later, he was right.
     
  12. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot Jane Goodall of the N&P Forum

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    Franks right. I went to Wyotech before it was Wyotech. I went another direction once I got out. Looking back, the knowledge was invaluable. At the time it just wasn't enough to land a job. A job working side by side with people that didn't go to school but had a ton more experience than I did. Things have changed since then so I don't even know if one can get a job as a mechanic (Tech) without going to school. I will say over and over that the school has more than paid for itself for the simple reason that I can do my own work. That saves money by the buckets.
     
  13. 67redcudavert

    67redcudavert Well-Known Member

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    Depending on where you go to school will give you more options.

    I worked in an engineering test lab for 30+ years testing exhaust parts, shocks and struts. We regularly had engineering coop students working there. And this was not just during the summer. Some schools, like Kettering Univ. have students go to school three months, then work somewhere for three months and keep rotating back and forth.

    You can learn a lot more that way. Plus, depending what job opportunity you get for that three months you might be able to start developing skills like welding, machining, sheet metal, electrical and more.

    If you can handle it the engineering degree is worth pursuing. The son of a good friend that graduated with his mechanical engineering degree two years ago had a job lined up with Roush enterprises for 64K a year before he was even out of school.
     
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