1972 Duster Build with my Daughter

Members Restorations

  1. Jim Kueneman

    Jim Kueneman FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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    Time to drag out the paint gun.... new scoops for the Duster!

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    • Stephen Mulkey

      Stephen Mulkey FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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      That's looking mighty fine. Love that hood
       
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      • Revhendo

        Revhendo Master ACME Tech

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        They're never really done. Are they?
         
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        • sireland67

          sireland67 FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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          Nice, I have a set for a Duster I recently bought, I sanded them down, and primed them, just need to sand the primer, and shoot some black on them.
           
        • MaxPF

          MaxPF Member

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          The
          I just wanted to correct a misconception: the RV2 isn't really a "power hog", it just seems that way. The amount of shaft power needed to drive a compressor depends on the compressor's displacement, volumetric efficiency, isentropic efficiency, mechanical efficiency, all else being equal. Certain other factors affect this as well, such as how much oil circulates in the system. Less oil circulation results in improved efficiency, and compressors with sumps like the RV2 circulate much less oil vs "modern"* axial piston compressors. Overall, from published results, twin-cylinder compressors like the RV2 and York are actually more efficient vs axial piston compressors like the Sanden, Seltec, Denso, GM a6, DA6, etc, and other swash and wobble plate compressors.

          The reason the RV2 (and York, Tecumseh, RM R4) has the reputation as a "power hog" is twofold. First, they DO use a lot of power, but in return you get a very high refrigerating capacity due to their large displacement combined with high volumetric efficiency. Second, this large effective displacement combined with a relatively small, inefficient condenser results in higher head pressures, which increases power usage. Similar displacement "modern" compressors actually pump less refrigerant due to lower volumetric efficiency (VE), which means they have less capacity but also lower head pressures and thus lower power input requirements. Another thing that I think contributes to this is that the two cylinders have large torque fluctuations per revolution compared to axials with more cylinders, so when the clutch engages against head pressure the immediate response is more noticeable.

          If you're not concerned with a totally accurate restoration you may want to consider safely packaging and storing your original tube and fin R-12 condenser and installing a modern (no quotes) parallel flow condenser. Sites like UAC have dimensions for OE and universal parallel flow condensers. You need to watch for the tubes and mounts to make sure a given condenser fits in the available space, and you will want to make adapter brackets to mount it without modifying/hacking your original core support. Within the constraints of your original condenser or available mounting area, you want the biggest, thickest parallel flow unit you can fit. This is true even if you use R-12, and especially true if you use R-134a. A parallel flow condenser will reduce head pressure and provide more subcooling, which will increase system capacity and efficiency while actually reducing power consumption by the compressor. A win-win-win.

          All that said, you are otherwise correct: The RV2 is simple, reliable, easy to rebuild, and HEAVY! Who cares? You don't have to hand-carry it wherever you go, and it will outlast 10 Sanden compressors. Just run it for a minute or two every couple weeks to keep the front seal oiled, and it will stay refrigerant-tight and last an extremely long time.

          * I put "modern" in quotes because the axial swash plate and wobble plate designs are not new. The first such design mass produced for automotive use was the GM A5, back in 1955. That makes the axial piston design just as old as the Chrysler V2 and York and Tecumseh twin-cylinder designs. GM replaced the A5 with the A6 in the 60's, with the A6 being another axial piston swash plate design. The only thing "modern" about the current Sanden, Seltec, Denso, etc. compressors is that they are light weight and disposable. You can replace shaft seals in them, and even valve plates, gaskets, and o-rings in some models, but once they are worn out you throw them away and get a new one. I guess this makes them just like the modern vehicles they are put in. You won't see 50+ year old versions of these "modern" compressors that just need a new seal and gaskets, because they will never last that long.
           
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          • Jim Kueneman

            Jim Kueneman FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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            Thanks, I am really struggling with getting this Duster AC to work well. I did buy a new condenser but it was a copy of the original not parallel flow and I am struggling with head pressure. I can't get all the R134A I should be able to get into it before the compressor dead heads and the clutch slips. I just found that Classic Air makes a parallel flow condenser for the '73 Dart so I am going to order one.

            Jim
             
          • MaxPF

            MaxPF Member

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            Wish I had been here back when you posted this. I would've saved you from a likely horrid reman. Parts for these compressors, and indeed complete NOS compressors, can be had on Ebay. Just looked today and found one NOS valve plate for the RV2, SIX! NOS RV2 compressors, and virtually every NOS part needed to rebuild an RV2. Another option is to buy relatively inexpensive "parts donor" compressors for things like valve plates, rods, crankshafts, etc. The compressor you rebuilt looked really good, and IMO you would've been better off sticking with it and just replacing the valve plate(s).

            My experience with cheap Chinese TXV's has been the same as everything else that is cheap and Chinese. Again, you're better served getting a NOS valve. Another option, which I use, is to convert to a real Sporlan TXV of the type used on stationary refrigeration and AC systems. They're a bit larger and have flare inlets, outlets, and balance port connections, so either mods to the existing ends or adapter fittings must be used. However, they have massive advantages. They are more stable, have fine mesh inlet screens, are much longer lived, are made in the USA, and best of all the superheat can be adjusted while the system is charged and operating! If it's something you ever want to consider, shoot me a PM and I can show you my system with such a TXV installed. FWIW, I'm a refrigeration guy, so I kinda geek out on stuff like this :D
             
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            • MaxPF

              MaxPF Member

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              How expensive is it? Reason I ask is that universal parallel flow condensers are pretty reasonably priced and available in many sizes and configurations. Go to this link: Welcome to UAC and under "NA Types" select "Condensers". Under "NA Categories" select "Condenser". And under "NA Sub Categories" select "Parallel Flow". Then poke the [Search] button. You will get a page full of different sizes and configurations of generic non-application condensers. When you get to the bottom of the page, click the wide blue bar that says "more", and you will get more condensers. Keep doing that until you no longer get a "more" bar.

              You may also want to search the application section for your vehicle and see if UAC has a parallel flow unit for your vehicle. It may well be cheaper than the Classic Air/Vintage Air tax. You can generally get any UAC parts from Rock Auto or Ebay. There's also a place here in Mesa that I deal with called Air Components that carries much of this stuff, although I have found them to be more expensive on average. Summit and Jegs have a lot of this stuff, too!

              If you're patient you can also explore OE parallel flow condensers from newer vehicles that may fit your car with some mounting mods. This is what I did - I used an early GMT400 condenser (88-94 GM pickup) that is a parallel flow direct fit for the original tube and fin R-12 condenser. It was designed for R-134a retrofits in those trucks. With a few plumbing mods and bracket fabrication I was able to fit it in my square body Chevy Blazer. Even though there are parallel flow direct fit condensers for square body Chevies, thwy tend to not really be "direct fit", the cores are significantly smaller than the GMT400 unit I used, and they cost $100 more. This is just an example of how a condenser for one vehicle can be modded to fit another. What I like about the GMT400 condenser vs a generic condenser is the thickness: the universal generic condensers are typically 5/8" thick, while the GMT400 unit I used is about 7/8" thick. Every bit helps, especially with such a large displacement compressor.
               
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              • Jim Kueneman

                Jim Kueneman FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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                I was mistaken, it is for a B body... have not found one yet. I will look at your suggestions.
                 
              • Jim Kueneman

                Jim Kueneman FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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                Yes they do! UAC
                CN 3330PF

                How does one order it? Is it wholesale only?
                 
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                • MaxPF

                  MaxPF Member

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                  Are you certain? The buyers guide in UAC's site lists it as being for a 73-74 Valiant, Duster, and Dart. Unfortunately they don't have a pic, nor do they list dimensions. That makes it impossible to determine if it's the right part, or if it could be made to work at all.

                  I found some tube and fin OE type replacements on Ebay. From the looks of them it would be pretty easy to modify any suitable size universal condenser to fit in place of the stock one. The universal units have fittings directly on the end tanks, and ribs on each side with holes to screw or rivet any mounts you want to them. All you would have to do is fabricate the brackets and perhaps one hard line from the looks of it. Not difficult at all, really.
                   
                • Jim Kueneman

                  Jim Kueneman FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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                  Remember this Duster is a '73 Dart from the Dash forward including the radiator/radiator support/AC condenser.
                   
                • MaxPF

                  MaxPF Member

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                  Ah, I see. Unfortunately, I couldn't find one online. Call these guys: Air Components & Manufacturing Inc | Automotive Air Conditioning Parts. Ask them is they can order that part. Make sure they know it is a UAC manufactured part so they can contact their appropriate supplier. They are likely your best chance. Another place to try is Arizona Mobile Air, Inc. | Automotive Air Conditioning Parts & Equipment. As a final resort, call UAC and see if you can buy it direct, or if they can point you to a distributor that can get it for you: Welcome to UAC.

                  Good luck!
                  Max
                   
                • Jim Kueneman

                  Jim Kueneman FABO Gold Member FABO Gold Member

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                  Kaelyn and I finally installed her scoops today... She also got a 2015 CR-V with 17,000 miles on it for Christmas so we cleaned up the Duster and also finally "installed the monogramed California Cover, darling"

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